16 Things You Should Know About Shopping at an Electronics Store, Part 2: 5 Things You Should Know About the Sales Pitch

16 Things You Should Know About Shopping at an Electronics Store, Part 2: 5 Things You Should Know About the Sales Pitch post image

This article is Part 2 of a three part series: 16 Things You Should Know About Shopping at an Electronics Store

Part 1: 6 Things You Should Know Before You Go To the Store
Part 2: 5 Things You Should Know About the Sales Pitch
Part 3: 5 Things You Should Know After You’ve Decided to Buy the Big Item

5 Things You Should Know About The Sales Pitch

Salespeople use many methods to be persuasive. Many of these methods play on psychology. And yes, they work. And if a salesperson uses them effectively, they’re going to make a lot of sales. That’s not a bad thing – it means they’re good at their job. However, you, as a consumer should be aware of these ploys, because simple awareness can save you a bundle of money.

1. We Are More Likely to Buy From a Salesperson if We Like Them – People like positive interactions with a salesperson, and we are more likely to buy from a likeable salesperson. This is a fact: we’re more apt to buy from someone who is like us, and if not like us, then at least who we like. Salespeople may engage us in conversation. Nice weather? Out with your family? Skiing? You’re relaxing, you’re trusting. Remember, you are buying the product, not the relationship. Do you like the product? I know of a cell service provider who gathers shopper information about their salespeople. This is one thing they asked: did the salesperson engage you in conversation about your interests? (Note: weather does not count). Ask yourself whether the product you’re buying is the one you really want, and not just because the salesperson did a great job.

2. We Listen to Authority – We listen to authority, and sometimes, just a suit and tie is enough to imply authority and knowledge about products. A lot of salespeople in electronics stores are dressed in a shirt and tie. Don’t assume that they know everything about your product. Their clothing may just make them a well-dressed (or not so well-dressed) non-authority. I’m sure we’ve all experienced asking a salesperson a question, and having them say, “hmm, let me see,” at which point they (and I grimace here) pick up the packaging and read the side of the box. Yup, glad the store is making a healthy profit to pay for that expertise. Make sure you are your own authority on the product. Research the products first. It’s amazing how much you can find out with a bit of research online before going to the store.

3. The More We Talk, the More We’re Committed – What does commitment mean? Commitment means that you will want to be consistent. Do you like to watch movies? Yes? Then you will want this type of television….. According to Cialdini in the Psychology of Persuasion, as soon as you start answering questions and committing yourself to being a certain way, you’re going to stick with it. In the electronics context, that means that the salesperson has a much better chance of upselling to you to meet your needs (Well, if you like movies, nothing compares to…). So keep your mind focused on the features you’re looking for, and don’t be swept up in the upselling.

4. If A Product is Scarce, We Want It – We want an item more if we know it’s scarce. It’s true. Salespeople know this, and use it. According to Cialdini, as soon as people find out that an item they’re interested in is scarce, they want it even more than they did. If a salesperson states that they’re not sure if a great product is still in stock – tell yourself that in all likelihood it’s a sales ploy, because otherwise you’ll be waiting with bated breath all the more ready to buy it if they appear with it.

I’ve learned never to trust this. I once bought a big ticket item from a well-known chain. During the sales process, the salesperson told me how great this item was, and stressed to me how he didn’t think there were any more of the item. He would have to check and see. He left for a few minutes. On his return, he was beaming, and had brought the paperwork for the sale. Good news – there was one left; I was lucky. We happily made the transaction. Later on, I talked to an industry source who was knowledgeable about this particular chain. It turns out that the salespeople are instructed to state that there was limited stock, and that they would have to check to see if there was one available. They are actually evaluated on whether they consistently do this in their interactions with customers. I now recognize this sales tactic for what it is – a method of persuasion. Be aware of it, and don’t fall for it.

5. Don’t Forget About Price Matching – By now, you’ve heard the sales pitch, you may have been told that items are limited, and you may feel a bond with your salesperson. It’s starting to feel like they deserve the sale. Remember price matching. Remember your online prices. Before the sale is made is when the salesperson is willing to negotiate, price match, and basically do what it takes to make the sale. Take a break. You may have been shown an item that you didn’t research beforehand. Go home, look it up, or use your smartphone, or go to the nearby local library and use their computers. Is it a good deal? Do this BEFORE buying. I’ve seen price differences between the store’s floor prices and their online prices. Same store. Drastic price differences. And yes, they’ll honour their online prices.

You’ve decided to buy the product. But it doesn’t end there…

Next:
Part 3: 5 Things You Should Know After You’ve Decided to Buy the Big Item

Read the rest of the article:
Part 1: 6 Things You Should Know Before You Go To the Electronics Store
Part 3: 5 Things You Should Know After You’ve Decided to Buy the Big Item

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